History Course Offerings and Descriptions

3361/2 CIVICS

1 semester; 1 credit
The Illinois General Assembly updated the Illinois School Code to require that all students beginning with the class of 2020 take a civics course. In this course, students will utilize the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills which they have refined through their studies to acquire a better understanding of the government of the United States and its political process. Students will use this understanding to better interrogate the social, political, and economic issues of contemporary American society.

321, 3217, 3219 World History B

2 semesters; 2 credits
This is a survey course utilizing the history of world cultures and historic relationships to deliver targeted instruction aimed at enhancing student literacy and writing skills.  In additional, students will receive additional supports in the areas of executive functioning and social emotional learning.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the world history graduation requirement.

323, 3238, 3234/3236 World History

2 semesters; 2 credits
A multicultural, social, economic, and political survey of the world. Successful completion of this course meets the world history graduation requirement.

325 World History A

 2 semesters; 2 credits
A multicultural, social, economic and political survey of world history.  This content material serves as a vehicle to build foundational writing and reading skills to student success.  Students enrolled in this class will be challenged with readings of above grade-level complexity and should expect the content to move at a more expedited pace. Successful completion of this course satisfies the world history graduation requirement.

12HX world studies immersion/literacy support (also see English division & academic support course offerings)

Open to qualified freshmen approved for the transition program
2 semesters; 2 credits
World Studies Immersion combines English, Literacy and History curricula and integrates the disciplines to expand the student’s experience.  As a part of the three period World Studies Immersion course, students are enrolled in WSI English, WSI History and WSI Literacy Seminar. WSI Literacy Seminar provides intensive, direct reading instruction to increase vocabulary, reading comprehension, word study, and reading rate. By immersing the reading strategies and instruction into the World Studies class, students will benefit from the reinforcement and practice of applying their skills. 

125H World Studies (Also see English Division Course Offerings)

Open to freshmen
2 semesters; 4 credits
This double-period course is an introduction to both the English and history curricula at the high school and is taught cooperatively by an English teacher and a history teacher. The course is designed to integrate the disciplines and expand the experience that would otherwise be gained in the English and World History courses. Fundamentals in reading skills, writing skills, and critical thinking skills are emphasized. Successful completion of this course meets the world history graduation requirement and provides two credits in English.

134H American Studies (Also see English Division Course Offerings)

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: World History or its equivalent and English Literature
2 semesters; 4 credits
This double-period course, taught by a history teacher and an English teacher, focuses on the inter-relatedness of American culture through the study of history, art, literature, and everyday life. Main emphasis is from 1607 to the present. Successful completion of this course meets the American history graduation requirement and provides two credits in American literature.

331, 3317, 3319 UNITED STATES HISTORY B

Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: World History B or equivalent
2 semesters; 2 credits
The focus of this course is the study of the historical development of the United States, its ideas and institutions from the Age of Exploration to the present.  Students will learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography.  They will obtain a basic knowledge of culture through a survey of major issues, movements, people and events in the United States history.  Students taking this course will have additional supports in building literacy, writing an executive functioning skills.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the American History graduation requirement.

333, 3338, 3334/3336 UNITED STATES History

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: World History or equivalent
2 semesters; 2 credits
The focus of this course is the study of the historical development of the United States, its ideas and institutions from the Age of Exploration to the present.  Students will learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography.  They will obtain a basic knowledge of culture through a survey of major issues, movements, people and events in the United States history.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the American History graduation requirement.

335 UNITED STATES History A

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: World History or equivalent
2 semesters; 2 credits
The focus of this course is the study of the historical development of the United States, its ideas and institutions from the Age of Exploration to the present.  Students will learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography.  They will obtain a basic knowledge of culture through a survey of major issues, movements, people and events in the United States history.  Students taking this class will be challenged with a greater complexity in reading materials and the application of ideas through performance and discussion.  Successful completion of this course satisfies the American History graduation requirement.

337 AP UNITED STATES History

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: World History or equivalent
2 semesters; 2 credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement.” Ambitious students are assisted in developing the factual and interpretive abilities necessary to succeed on the 3-hour American History Advanced Placement exam. Emphasis is placed on writing analytical essays and papers. Students are expected to work at the level of an introductory college survey course. High scores on the AP exam often result in college credit. Successful completion of this course meets the American history graduation requirement.

369/2 AP UNITED STATES POLITICS/Government

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement”.  This course introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States.  The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments.  This course explores the theoretical underpinning of U.S. government and politics to provide students with a firm understanding of current events.  This course will prepare students to take the AP United States Politics and Government exam, scores from which may count for college credit depending on college or university of choice.

372/2 Criminal and Civil Law

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
This course offers students an authentic, case-driven introduction to the study of law.  Students are challenged to conceptualize how the American legal system works and grapple with complex questions about why our laws are what they are.  This challenge is enhanced by confronting the intersectionality of law, history, politics and society.  Students interests served well by this course: US History, laws, government, and the criminal justice system.  Skills targeted in this course: Analytical reading and writing, oral presentation and critical thinking.

358/2, 3587/3588 Sociology

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
Sociology is the scientific study of human societies and human group behavior. Topics of study include culture and cultural evolution, socialization, deviance and social control, modern institutions, social class and stratification, social change, race relations, and approaches to conflict resolution. Student interests served well by this course: race, human behavior, psychology, social justice and psychology.  Skills targeted by this course: research, reading comprehension, argumentative writing, and critical thinking.   

359/2, 3598/2, 3594/2-3596/2 Psychology

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
An introduction to the science of psychology, this course includes units on psychological perspectives, scientific methodology, personality, biopsychology, healthy adjustment, consciousness, abnormal behavior, developmental psychology, and therapy.  Student interests served well by this course: psychology, human behavior, natural sciences.  Skills targeted by this course: reading for understanding.

361 AP Psychology

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
2 semesters; 2 credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement.” The AP Psychology Course is designed to introduce you to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings.  You will be exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and theories associated with each of the major subfields within psychology.  You will also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  The course is intended to provide the scope and level of academic accomplishment expected in a college introductory psychology course.  In addition, the course aims to instill knowledge, skills and attitudes to apply to our own lives, while also preparing students to be successful on the AP Psychology exam.  This course will prepare students to take the AP Psychology exam, scores from which may count for college credit depending on college or university of choice.  Student interests served well by this course: psychology, human behavior.

368/2 Philosophy A

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
This honors level course is an inquiry into the nature of knowledge and truth, the mind and soul, good and evil, free will and determinism, justice and the state, and god(s). The course combines careful reading of classical and modern texts with the application of philosophical thinking to current issues. The course aims to acquaint students with the questions and issues typical to philosophy, deepen and widen students’ appreciation of our cultural heritage, encourage self-reflection, and sharpen students’ powers of critical thinking and written expression. Student interests served well by this course: history, values, morality, reading and debate.  Skills targeted in this course: critical thinking, analysis and reason, complex reading and independent opinion.

344 AP European History

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
2 semesters; 2 credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement”. AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European history course.  In AP European History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to the present.  Students develop and use the continuity over time; and argument development.  The course also provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical. Developments in different times and places; interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power, individual and society, and national and European identity.

365/2 African History

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
This is a survey course in the rich variety of cultures, religions, and nations located on the African continent. Included is the study of Africa’s geography, its natural resources, and its importance in the global village. Study begins with prehistoric times, continues through Africa’s long history, and includes the arrival of Asians, Arabs, and Europeans to the African continent. Africa’s experience during the Age of Imperialism through the emergence of the independent nations is also studied. Major emphasis is placed on the Nile Valley civilizations, kingdoms of West Africa, the African diaspora, African nationalism, and Africa’s role in the late twentieth century. Reading, map skills, essay skills, chronology, vocabulary, class projects, and current events are emphasized.  Student  interests served well by this course: Africa, history, race and culture.  Skills targeted by this course: reading map skills, critical thinking, writing and research.

366/2, 3667/3668 African American History

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent 
1 semester; 1 credit
This survey course explores the African American experience in the United States from 1607 to the present.  Emphasis is on two interrelated themes: the internal history of the black community, its origins, its development and growth, its triumphs and tribulations in America, and the ways in which race, class, ethnicity, and gender illuminate the African American community as both producer and collaborator in the race, gender, social justice, and culture.  Skills targeted in this course: enhanced literary analysis, argumentative/nonfiction writing, critical thinking.

377/2 Latin American History

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
Organized thematically from pre-Columbian times to the present, units of study include European contact and conquest, colonial history, independence movements in Latin America, postcolonial readjustment, neocolonialism, nationalism, revolution and counter-revolution, and modern issues. This course will enhance students' understanding not only of Latin culture and American foreign policy vis-a-vis Latin America, but also of their place in the world. Students interests served well by this course: history, culture, politics, US and international relations and current events.  Skills targeted by this course: reading, map skills, critical thinking, writing and research.

367/2 Modern Middle Eastern History A

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
This honors level course provides a historical understanding of the social and political changes in the Middle East since the emergence of the Ottoman Empire, particularly over the past 2 centuries. It covers the main social, economic, and intellectual currents that have transformed this region of the world. The primary emphasis is how events today have been shaped and affected by the past. Focus is on the lands of the former Ottoman Empire (present-day Turkey, Palestine/Israel, Syria, Iraq, and Egypt) and Iran.  Student interests served well by this course: history, culture, politics, U.S. and international relations, and current events.  Skills targeted by this course: critical thinking, analysis, and complex reading for understanding.

364/2 Asian Studies

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: United States History or equivalent
1 semester; 1 credit
This semester-long course focuses on the modern history and culture of Asia with a focus on South Asia (India and Pakistan) and East Asia (China, Korea and Japan).  Students will explore how culture, politics, and economics have shaped these regions and their relationships with the global community.  Students will work to refine the critical thinking, literacy, and writing skills from their foundational coursework.  Students interests served well by this course: world history, culture, politics, U.S and international relations, and current events.  Skills targeted in this course: literacy, argumentative writing, research and critical thinking.

357/2 Women in History

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
This course explores the political, economic, and social experience of women throughout history.  With a major focus on contemporary issues, Women in History is a semester course where, first quarter, students are introduced to the discipline of Women and Gender Studies.  Second quarter, students explore women’s activism throughout American history from the  Antebellum period through the present.  Students interests served well by this course: US History, gender, sociology, and current events.  Skills targeted by this course: Literacy, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation.

375/2 The History of Chicago

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
  The History of Chicago is a semester-long course designed to develop your knowledge and excitement about this city’s rich history and culture.  The course follows Chicago’s history chronologically, but along the way we will study the art, architecture, geography, music, literature, crimes and scandals, sports, civil rights, education, immigration, social class issues, and politics that have shaped and defined the city.  Students interests served well by this course: US History,   Chicago, and social justice.  Skills targeted by this course: Reading, critical thinking, nonfiction/argumentative writing and oral presentation.

376/2 Sports and Resistance in American History

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
This course will view race, gender, and class divides in American history through the sporting lens with an emphasis on the periods from the Progressive Era through the present. This unique examination will emphasize the roles of government, governing bodies in sports, the media, owners, and athletes in the triumphs and struggles that have engulfed our nation's history. Viewing race, gender, and class through this prism will allow students to address these issues through a path that will appeal to the interests of a wide range of students.  Student interests served well by this course: athletics, gender, race, US history, and current events.  Skills targeted by this course: reading, oral presentation, and critical thinking.

378/2 Youth and Social Justice

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
This course will examine issues such as race, gender, sexual orientation, law, and the criminal justice system through the lens of sociology and social justice. This course is intended for college prep students and is designed to further enhance essential skills aligned with Common Core State Standards such as reading comprehension, writing, speaking, and analytical thinking. Students will utilize various reading and writing strategies intended to prepare them for further academic achievement.  Students interests served well by this course: history, current events, social justice, activism, and politics.  Skills targeted by this course: oral presentation, writing and reflection.

3791/2 HIP HOP IN UNITED STATES HISTORY AND SOCIETY

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
This course will examine the culture of Hip Hop and its continued impact on society through literature, media, film, discussions, and presentations. From Hip Hop’s early origins in the South Bronx of the 1970’s through today.  Students will explore the elements of Hip Hop, its connection to historical events, and societal impact. Students will expand upon their knowledge of Hip Hop culture, its impact on American culture and society, and the role they play within it.  Student interests served well by this course: race, gender, politics, history, music, and sociology.  Skills targeted in this course: critical thinking, analysis, writing, and reading for understanding.