Family and Consumer Sciences Department Course Offerings and Descriptions

703/2 CULINARY ARTS

1 semester; 1 credit
Culinary Arts is a course which exposes students to culinary basics. This course teaches students the skills needed in order to prepare a variety of foods. Culinary experiences will focus on fruits/vegetables, soups/salads/sauces, dairy/eggs, grains, quick/yeast breads and meal planning/entrees. Industry recognized safety and sanitation practices will be emphasized. Students will have the opportunity to earn dual credit with Triton College upon successful completion of the course.

704/2 Baking and Pastry

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts
1 semester; 1 credit
This course will concentrate on advanced food experiences in baking and pastry making. Students will build on the beginning baking skills learned in Culinary Arts. Experiences will focus on safety/sanitation, basic principles in baking, ingredients, yeast breads, breakfast breads/pastries, basic syrups, pies, tarts/cobblers, cake preparation and decoration, fondant, cookies, ice cream/sorbets, chocolate, and candy making. This class is recommended for students planning to pursue a degree in the culinary or pastry arts, as well as culinary enthusiasts.

7071/2 global foods

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts
1 semester; 1 credit
Global Foods is a culinary tour of the world and an adventure into advanced food preparation skills. Expand your horizons and broaden your knowledge of other countries as you develop an appreciation of international food customs and practices. You will prepare foods from various regions of the United States and other continents, such as Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America. While exploring connections between what we eat and cultures around us, we will cover the history and each region’s dietary customs, cuisines, and cooking methods.

708 mini-restaurant

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: Culinary Arts
2 semester; 2 credit
This course provides opportunities in menu planning, meal preparation, and table service with emphasis on quantity food and commercial food service in a mini-restaurant (Kettlestrings Cafe'). The class requires a specific level of knowledge and maturity to work in the fast-paced, highly visible setting of the Kettlestrings Cafe'. Topics include buying and storing foods, kitchen management, food service careers, safety, and sanitation. Students who earn credit in 703 Culinary Arts and 7072 Restaurant Management with grades of A or B may receive credit for HIA 132 Nutrition at Triton (see Triton College Credit section of this catalog).

715/2 Parenting

1 semester; 1 credit
This course addresses the major lifelong responsibilities of parenting. Units of study include parenting skills, roles and responsibilities, family planning, teen parenting, heredity, prenatal care, birth, and infant care and development.  Students will participate in a project with a computerized doll called “Real Care Baby" by Realityworks.

716/2 Child Development

1 semester; 1 credit
This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the growth and development of children.  Areas of study include physical, mental, social, and emotional development of infants, toddlers, and preschool-aged children. It is beneficial to students interested in human behavior and development, as well as those interested in child-related careers.

717/2 early childhood education

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: Child Development
1 semester; 1 credit
Early Childhood Education is a course offered to students after successful completion of Child Development. Students will be able to experience teaching as a possible career choice. The course includes the practical experience of preparing
and teaching preschool- aged children. The students will prepare lessons, observe children, and teach lesson plans in the River Forest Community Center’s preschool lab (at OPRF). Units of study include developmentally appropriate guidance and teaching techniques for preschoolers in the areas of art, music, social studies, language, writing, math, science, literacy, storytelling, dramatic play, and healthy snacks.

722/2 Housing and Interior Design

1 semester; 1 credit
This course provides experiences in housing choices and interior decorating decisions for both independent and family living. Emphasis is on activities and case problems pertaining to housing needs, costs, styles, furnishings, arrangements, and career opportunities. Special features include guest speakers and field trips to ASID Showcase House and the Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio. Final project includes planning rooms and decorating schemes using the elements and principles of design.

705 Clothing Construction 1

1 semester; 1 credit
Students with knowledge of patterns and use of the sewing machine will increase their skills in clothing construction techniques. Projects emphasize current fashion and industry technology. Wardrobe planning is evaluated through color and figure analysis and design elements and principles. Clothing maintenance is studied from the consumer perspective.

7061 Clothing Construction 2

Prerequisite: Clothing Construction 1
Semester 1 only; 1 credit
Students with knowledge of patterns and use of the sewing machine will increase their skills in clothing construction techniques. Students incorporate design principles and personal creativity into a variety of projects. Students are responsible for providing project materials.

711/2 Fashion Merchandising

1 semester; 1 credit
Students interested in fashion and merchandising as a career are encouraged to take this introduction to the various areas of fashion creation, marketing, and technology.    Fashion Merchandising explores both the development of fashion and the marketing and merchandising aspects of the fashion industry.  Topics include textile design development and production, wardrobe planning and consumer demand, fashion buying, display, and presentation.  This hands-on, project-based course encourages students to explore numerous career opportunities within the fashion industry.

719/2 Life on Your Own

Open to seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
This course prepares graduating seniors for life after high school with hands-on experiences for surviving on their own. Students will develop the life skills to handle situations encountered when living away from home. Topics include quick and easy meal preparation, simple clothing care, nutrition and wellness, and everyday home repairs. Students will create a personalized handbook to serve as a reference and resource for future use. This course does not fulfill the state consumer education graduation requirement.