Course Offerings and Descriptions


600/2, 6007/2, 6008, 6042/60062, 6009 FINANCIAL LITERACY F/S

Open to freshmen and sophomores
1 semester; 1 credit
This course is an introduction to practical economics and an overview of basic aspects of business. Emphasis is on the student’s role as consumer, producer, and citizen. Topics include money management, banking services, savings and investments, credit, insurance, business and government services, taxes, the American business system, and basic economics. Successful completion of this course fulfills the state consumer education requirement.

602/2, 6027/2, 6028, 60242/60262, 6029 FINANCIAL LITERACY J/S

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
Students learn about their rights and responsibilities as consumers. Topics include decision making, money management, insurance, credit, savings, marketplace frauds, and buying goods and services in the area of foods, clothing, housing, and new and used cars.  Successful completion of this course fulfills the state consumer education requirement.

604/2, 6057/2, 6049 Applied  Keyboarding/Introductory Microsoft Office

1 semester; 1 credit
This one-semester course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to master the skills of entering alphabetic, numeric, and symbolic information on a keyboard and a 10-key pad using the touch method of typing. Emphasis is placed on development of accuracy, speed, proper techniques, and correct fingering. Students learn how to use the computer as a learning tool for problem solving and in the production of both print and non-print materials. Critical thinking skills are taught through the use of project-based scenarios that challenge students to apply their hardware and software knowledge to solve tasks. Students who successfully complete this course will be well prepared in technology use and equipped to handle assignments from a variety of disciplines. Software that students will use include the Microsoft Office suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Publisher), MicroType, and Internet Explorer. Students who have completed a semester or more of touch keyboarding in middle school may elect to take Computer Applications to satisfy the computer proficiency graduation requirement. Successful completion of this course fulfills the computer proficiency graduation requirement.

628/2, 6388/2 Accounting and Investment Principles

1 semester; 1 credit
This class is a must for students who are contemplating a college degree in Accounting or Investments. The accounting cycle, system design, cash control, inventory methods,  receivables, and depreciation methods will be covered in the accounting  section. The Investments portion of the class will introduce planning, implementing, and managing a successful investment program.  Students will experience investing by raising money and investing in the stock market. The class will utilize as guest speakers the many accounting and investment professionals who live in our communities.

633/2, 6337, 6338 Computer Applications

Prerequisite: none, but the ability to type at least 30 WPM recommended
1 semester; 1 credit
Students use personal computers to learn a variety of applications such as graphics, word processing, email, database, spreadsheets, PowerPoint presentations, and exploring the Internet. Emphasis is placed on the components of Microsoft Office. May be combined with Advanced Computer Applications for a one-year course.  Successful completion of this course fulfills the computer proficiency graduation requirement.

632/2 Computer Applications A

Prerequisite: none, but the ability to type at least 30 WPM recommended
1 semester; 1 credit
In this honors level course, increased emphasis is placed upon concepts, abstract relationships, critical thinking, and creative thinking. Students use personal computers to learn a variety of applications such as graphics, word processing, email, databases, spreadsheets, PowerPoint presentations, and exploring the Internet. Analytical and investigative strategies will be the focus of the class using the components of Microsoft Office. Students will learn website creation and will complete integrated projects using Word, Access, and Excel. May be combined with Advanced Computer Applications for a one-year course.  Successful completion of this course fulfills the computer proficiency graduation requirement.

635/2 Advanced Computer Applications

Prerequisite: Computer Applications or strong working knowledge of Windows operating system software 
1 semester; 1 credit
This is a course in the use of personal computers for a variety of advanced applications such as spreadsheets, database, web page design, Photoshop, digital movie editing, and computer animation.  Successful completion of this course fulfills the computer proficiency graduation requirement.

636/2 Video Game and Multimedia Development

Prerequisite: Computer Applications
1 semester; 1 credit
Using a state-of-the-art multimedia design suite, students create several dynamic multimedia projects, including website components, kiosks, entertainment and educational CD-ROM titles, and interactive presentations. Students control bitmap images, text, sounds, and digital media. They determine and program their project to react to the viewer’s choices, and they edit existing movies and graphics for their own use. Students create advertising media for use with an Internet website. This course is available for students who are interested in in-depth knowledge and experience with high-level multimedia program development.

607/2 Website Development  I

Prerequisite: Computer Applications
1 semester; 1 credit
This course is designed for students who are interested in creating websites and learning aspects of the Internet, including search engines, newsgroups, email, and plug-ins. Students learn ways to create web pages, including using various GUI editors. Software packages such as Dreamweaver, Flash, Cool 3D, GIF Animator, Photoshop, and Fireworks are utilized. Students will develop a website to be published on the Internet as a final project.

608/2 Website Development II A

Prerequisite: Website  Development or teacher  recommendation
1 semester; 1 credit
Website Development Honors  prepares students to take the high-stakes CIW Foundations certification exam.  Those who pass the CIW Foundations exam earn the highly respected CIW Associate certification, which is recognized throughout the industry as validating essential Internet skills for the workplace.  A CIW Associate can use common Internet-ready applications, can create properly formed HTML/XHTML documents, knows CGI and database essentials, and can troubleshoot networks.

634/2 Small Business Management

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
This course is designed to provide students with information on the free enterprise system of our economy and to help them recognize the role of small business in our economy. It will help them identify their potential for small business ownership and will prepare them for entering the job market.  As a part of this course, students will prepare a business plan and may set up and run a small school-based business.

637 AP Economics 1-2

Open to juniors and seniors
2 semesters; 2 credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement.” This course is an introductory study of macro-economic and microeconomic principles including evolution of the U.S. economy, money and banking, business cycles, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, distribution of wealth, and the prevailing economic philosophies of Adam Smith, John Maynard Keynes, and others. Course content is designed to help students develop critical thinking skills through understanding, application, and analysis of fundamental economic concepts. AP Economics is a year-long course for those who want to take the AP examination in microeconomics and/or macroeconomics. Students who do not wish to take the AP exam can take either one semester or both semesters. Successful completion of this course fulfills the state consumer education requirement. Triton College dual credit may be available.

638 Business Incubator
Open to juniors and seniors
2 semesters; 2 credits
This dynamic program helps fulfill students’ business aspirations. It teaches entrepreneurship through hands-on learning in which students and volunteers engage in an authentic learning experience that provides students the opportunity to create and fully develop their own product or service. Entrepreneurs and business experts currently working in their field serve as volunteer coaches and mentors to guide student teams through the processes of developing hypotheses about a business concept and testing, adapting, and continually learning and improving with the goal of pitching their idea at the end of the year to secure actual funding from local sponsors and investors. This cycle of experimentation is combined with foundational business content such as economics, marketing, and finance. The course is well suited for students who will study entrepreneurship and business in college as well as those students who intend to enter the workforce after graduation.

639 Student Helpdesk Internship
Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: Application process and departmental approval.
2 semesters; 2 credits
This course is a student-run helpdesk that prepares students to provide first-line technical support to students, support staff, and teachers. Students are trained to listen, observe, and assess general end-user issues. The hands-on classroom environment gives students authentic learning experiences involving troubleshooting hardware, software, and network programs as well as processing tickets and inventory stock. Students have individualized career pathways of study that include customer service, leadership, and certification including Google and Microsoft Office Specialist, coding, and apps. Successful completion of this course fulfills the computer proficiency graduation requirement. The course may be repeated

640/2, 6458/2 Sports and Music Entertainment Marketing

1 semester; 1 credit
This course is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in business management and marketing careers.  The course will provide an overview of the basic concepts in marketing, develop decision making skills by applying these concepts to real-life problems, and provide experience in developing marketing strategies for products in various stages of their product life cycles. All phases of this class are taught using examples or products from the entertainment, music, hospitality, and/or sports world.  Past guest speakers have included representatives from the Illinois Film Office, ESPN, and Special Olympics. Opportunities for internships in sports, entertainment, and hospitality will be available.

646/2, 9867, 9858, 9854/9856, 9859 Inter-related Co-op

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Small Business Management or by application; Parental consent required
1 semester; 2 credits (1 for the course; 1 for the work experience
This cooperative work-training program provides part-time vocational training and technology preparation for students who want to attend college as well as those who want full-time employment following graduation. The course is part of a student's full course load. The course includes instruction in employment laws, interpersonal skills, work ethics, workplace knowledge, and career and college planning. The instructor will facilitate student job placement that involves a minimum of 15 hours of work per week for at least 12 weeks of the semester. Students will prepare career objectives and develop a work portfolio related to several career alternatives, including Human Services, Information Technology, Business, Marketing, Finance, Arts-AV Technology, STEM, Transportation, Distribution and Logistics, and Hospitality. Student performance is evaluated by the instructor and the employer. Although students will earn wages in the work portion of the course, evaluation emphasizes the work experience. In related vocational sections, students will be engaged in a curriculum that promotes the importance of technology internet safety, email usage, and cell phone usage as it relates to accessing and maintaining meaningful employment. The instructor will facilitate job placement, coaching, and monitoring of job performance throughout the semester. With assistance, students will seek competitive community employment.  Students will prepare career objectives and develop a work and career portfolio that reflects their career interests.

647/2, 9877, 9878, 9879 Work Experience

Open to juniors and seniors by application
1 semester; 1 credit
Students establish a mentor or partner from the business community. Students will be able to demonstrate acceptable personal characteristics through work experience. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain employment. Students must be employed at least 10 hours per week for 15 school weeks of the semester to receive credit. Students who obtain assistance in job placement will utilize curriculum that promotes the importance of technology, internet safety, and email usage and will utilize their cell phones as a supportive tool in fostering communication with parents regarding their work schedules and daily transitions. Assistance and support for some students will be provided in obtaining campus-based and competitive community employment based upon ongoing assessments that are embedded within the structure of the program.  Utilizing data daily, job coaches will monitor the student’s acquisition of job skills as it relates to their specific plan goals. Students will prepare a work portfolio that reflects their active engagement in the work experience. 

641/2 introduction to ENTREPRENEURship

1 semester; 1 credit
Students will learn how to develop business ventures from ideas to reality, developing knowledge of fundamental business principles and essential professional and interpersonal skills. The course takes students through the steps and considerations that entrepreneurs use to start up and successfully run a small business. Beginning with entrepreneurship skills and ideas, students also learn how to analyze the market for a potential business opportunity, research, develop and promote new products and services, apply basic financial management principles to ensure profit, and finally analyze the success of their business idea. In addition to quizzes based on course content, students are assessed mainly through group project work: part one involves pitching the idea in a “Shark Tank” environment, and part two involves writing a business report and presenting an analysis of their company’s performance in the 3-day “Entrepreneurship” event at school.