Science Course Offerings and Descriptions

501/2, 5018, 5014/5016 Health Education FS

(Freshmen and sophomores) or

502/2, 5017/2 Health Education JS

(Juniors and seniors)
1 semester; 1 credit
Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, those areas mandated by the Illinois School Code Comprehensive Health Education Program (105 ILCS 110/3). Subject matter includes the prevention and control of diseases including AIDS, consumer health, safety education, mental wellness, alcohol and drug use and abuse, human growth and development, human sexuality, nutrition, physical fitness, dental care, and steroid abuse. Successful completion of this course fulfills the state health education requirement. Credit in this course may not be applied toward the high school’s graduation requirement of two laboratory science credits.

505, 5057 Physical Science

Open to freshmen
Placement determined by freshman placement process
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course focuses on the use of the scientific method to solve problems and helps to develop basic laboratory skills. Students study earth science, chemistry, and physics.

513 Biology

Open to freshmen concurrently enrolled in Algebra or higher whose placement scores indicate a strong possibility for success
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course emphasizes problem-solving techniques and laboratory work. Topics include the nature of science and the scientific method, molecular and cellular biology, enzyme action, ecology, photosynthesis, genetics, taxonomy, and population biology.  Some sections of this course will include supported and enriched instruction to reinforce rigorous science instruction for all students.

515 Biology A

Open to students whose placement scores are above average. Concurrent enrollment or successful completion of Intermediate Algebra F (A) or Intermediate Algebra A or higher highly recommended
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
The same topics are studied as  in 513 Biology but with greater depth in both the treatment of the concepts and in the use of open-ended laboratory problems.

517 Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: 1 year of biology and 1 year of chemistry, Models of Chemistry, or ILS 3-4.
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
Starting with the microscopic study of body tissues, this course then explores in detail the major systems of the human body. The course is designed for students who have serious interest in pursuing careers related to human or veterinary medicine, nursing, or sports medicine and for those students who would like to enhance their knowledge in biology and physiology.

519 InvestigatiONAL Research, DESIGN, AND Innovation A  (IRDI)

Open to juniors or seniors
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 1 year of biology (513, 515, or 525) and 1 year of chemistry (575, 577, or 523) or teacher recommendation. Concurrent enrollment or completion of physics is strongly recommended.
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This year long, rapid paced, college level (college credit upon successful completion), capstone STEM honors course is designed for independent and academically driven juniors or seniors who have completed at least three years of laboratory science and math (or that are concurrently enrolled in their third year) who are interested in pursuing research in the fields of Science or Engineering. Each student will have the opportunity to develop an open ended research project that he or she will have the entire year to investigate using scientific laboratory or engineering design techniques. The student will be responsible for planning and implementing each phase of his or her project. Each student will be responsible for finding an “e-mentor” that is a published expert in the area the student is investigating and maintain collaboration with that professional throughout the year. Post- Baccalaureate students from Dominican University will be present on a regular basis to assist with mentoring during class time each week. Students will read scientific journals, develop hypotheses, collect and analyze data, perform statistical analyses, comprise a formal research poster and write a formal research paper, which will be submitted to local, state and national/international science competitions.

521 Models of Physics (COLLEGE PREP OR HONORS)

Open to freshmen and sophomores.
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment or completion of a first year high school Algebra course
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course focuses on helping students learn Science content by consistently practicing the process of Science. Students will develop mathematical models using their skills from Algebra to help them observe and explain the major concepts in energy, forces, motion, electricity, and magnetism. Heavy emphasis is placed on planning experiments, evaluating data, generating evidence based claims, and applying understandings to make predictions. Students are required to collaborate productively with classmates during investigations and engage in frequent class discussions to develop both their understandings of course content and ability to participate in scientific discourse.  Any student enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to earn Honors credit through the successful completion and presentation of a year-long science research project.

523 Models of Chemistry (COLLEGE PREP OR HONORS)

Open to sophomores and juniors
Prerequisite: Algebra or higher and Models of Physics
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course builds on the skills that students acquire in the Models of Physics course to further develop student abilities in the areas of planning experiments, evaluating data, generating evidence based claims, and applying understandings to make predictions. Students will again develop mathematical models using their skills from Algebra to help them observe and explain the major concepts in Chemistry including atomic theory and nuclear chemistry, chemical structure and bonding, molecular geometry, stoichiometry and quantitative analysis, gas laws, acid/base chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, oxidation/reduction reactions, and basic organic chemistry.  The topics discussed will continue to develop the students’ understanding of the particle model of matter, energy and the behavior of electrons that were first introduced in the Models of Physics course. Student to Student collaboration and communication remains an emphasis in this course with students frequently working in problem solving teams and engaging in class discussions. Any student enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to earn Honors credit through the successful completion and presentation of a year-long science research project.

525 MODELS OF BIOLOGY (College Prep or Honors)

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Completion of Models of Chemistry
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course continues to build on the skills that students acquire in the Models of Physics and Models of Chemistry courses to further develop student abilities in the areas of planning experiments, evaluating data, generating evidence based claims, and apply understandings to make predictions. . Evolution serves as a unifying content theme in this course as students study topics in anatomy, ecology, biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, and anatomy. Relative to previous courses in the sequence, a new emphasis will be placed on using statistics to evaluate the quality of experimental data. Student to student collaboration and communication remains an emphasis in this course with students frequently working in problem solving teams and engaging in class discussions. Any student enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to earn Honors credit through the successful completion and presentation of a year-long science research project.

552 Astronomy

Open to juniors and seniors
1 semester; 1 credit
This technology-enhanced course focuses on the fundamental study of the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies, black holes, and quasars. Methods of study include image processing, laboratory work, and optional fieldwork. Limited algebraic math is involved. Credit in this course may not be applied toward the high school’s graduation requirement of two laboratory science credits.

554, 5547, 5548, 5549 Environmental Science

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: 1 year of biology or completion of S508 with teacher recommendation; and 1 year of chemistry
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course explores the science behind today’s environmental issues through lecture, discussion, documentary, laboratory experiments, field study, and independent research.

556, 5567, 5568, 5564/5566, 5569 GEOScience

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: 2 laboratory credits earned in a chemistry course (577,575,573, or 523)
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
In this lab-based course, students will learn about earthquakes, volcanoes, the Earth’s history, the processes that shape the Earth’s surface, and the Earth’s resources. The course will seek to answer 3 central questions: “What is the universe and what is Earth’s place in it?” “How and why is Earth constantly changing?” and “How do Earth’s surface processes and human activities affect each other?” Activities include analysis of mineral samples, construction of models, optional field trips, and online simulations.

558 Geology A

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: 1 year of laboratory science
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This college-level course is a study of the solid earth and processes that shape it. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the way in which the Earth functions as a dynamic system through inquiry-based activities and experimentation.  Triton College dual credit may be available.

559 Anthropology

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: 1 year of biology or completion of Models of Chemistry or Integrated Laboratory Science 3-4, or completion of S508 with teacher recommendation
1 semester; 1 credit
This course is about the study of man from a physical aspect. Course work includes information, ideas, concepts, and theories of biological anthropology. Topics of study include the evolutionary biology of humans, the fossil record, the human skeleton, both individual and population genetics, primatology, human adaptation, human behavior, and the development of culture. Credit in this course may not be applied toward the high school's graduation requirement of two laboratory science credits.

561 Physics P

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Algebra
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
The course stresses phenomena that can be observed through experimentation. Laboratory work is quantitative and demonstrates everyday applications of physics. Laboratory activities in physics are coordinated to complement scientific understanding and to strengthen problem solving skills. Topics include a study of mechanics, electricity, magnetism, light and sound waves.

563 Physics

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Algebra
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
The course stresses phenomena that can be observed through experimentation. Data collection and quantitative analysis are stressed in the laboratory.  Topics include a study of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, light and sound waves, quantum theory, and nuclear physics.

565 Physics A

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra F (A) or Intermediate Algebra A or Advanced Algebra F (A) or Advanced Algebra A
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This fast-paced, highly mathematical course studies the same topics as Physics but in greater depth. It is recommended that students have credit or concurrent enrollment in trigonometry.

573 ChemCom

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: 1 year of lab science or completion of S508
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
ChemCom (Chemistry in the Community) is a first-year high school chemistry course developed by the American Chemical Society that presents the principles of chemistry in the context of relevant social issues. Issues covered are water quality, resource conservation, petroleum use, air quality, and nuclear chemistry. Each unit contains a variety of decision making activities to give students practice applying chemistry to solve problems. Specific chemistry topics include writing formulas, balancing equations, chemical and physical changes, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, chemical periodicity, bonding, solids, liquids, gases, solutions, energy, acids and bases, salts, and oxidation/reduction.

575 Chemistry

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and Biology (513 or 515), or Biological Science (509 or S508) with teacher recommendation
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This first-year high school chemistry course studies properties of matter, chemical formulas and symbols, writing and balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, physical states of matter, current and past atomic models, nuclear chemistry, the multi-electron atom, the periodic tables and trends, chemical bonding, solutions, thermodynamics, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, and electrochemistry.

577 Chemistry A

Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra F (A) or Intermediate Algebra A or Advanced Algebra F (A)  or Advanced Algebra A and Biology A or recommendation of current instructor
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This fast-paced, highly mathematical course studies properties of matter, chemical formulas and symbols, writing and balancing chemical equations, stoichiometry, the physical state of matter, current and past atomic models, nuclear chemistry, the multi-electron atom, the periodic tables and trends, chemical bonding, solutions, thermodynamics, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, and electrochemistry. Compared with Chemistry, the laboratory work in this course is more comprehensive, and more attention is paid to data analysis.

578 intro to health careers & medical terminology

Open to seniors
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course is a survey course offering a broad range of information on career opportunities in the health field and available educational programs in Illinois.  Participation in this course will assist the high school student in making appropriate career decisions in the health occupations.  This course also offers students the opportunity to earn dual credit with Triton College for their Essentials of Medical Terminology course.  Students will study the origin and the basic structure of medical words, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms and plurals.  The ability to community with a professional vocabulary is essential in the health care field.  Students will exit this course better prepared to do so.

581 AP Environmental Science

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry, or teacher recommendation. Concurrent enrollment or completion of physics recommended
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement.” This course is designed to be the equivalent of the first-year college course in environmental science. Laboratory experiments, field studies, independent research, and computer simulations are used to develop analytical and research skills. Topics include sustain-ability, interdependence of the Earth’s systems, environmental quality, human population growth and related topics, and renewable and nonrenewable resources. Triton College dual credit may be available.

587 AP Biology

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology (513, 515, or 525), completion of Chemistry (575, 577, or 523), or approval of division head . Concurrent enrollment or completion of physics is strongly recommended.
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement.” This fast-paced and rigorous course follows the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum. It is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. The class work differs significantly from our first-year courses in Biology with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the type of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students. This course will engage students in a lab based curriculum with emphasis placed on open-ended inquiry labs. Content topics include biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, diversity of life, ecology, and animal and plant structure and function. Triton College dual credit may be available.

588 AP Chemistry

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Biology A (515), and Chemistry A (577), or teacher recommendation.  Concurrent enrollment or completion of physics recommended
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement.” This course is designed to be the equivalent of the first-year college course in general chemistry. The class work assumes that the student has both a mastery of mathematics and a high level of understanding from the first- year course in chemistry. Topics include electrochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, descriptive chemistry, and acids and bases. The laboratory is used to conduct quantitative experiments. Triton College dual credit may be available.

589 AP Physics C

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 1 year of biology, 1 year of chemistry  and 1 year of physics
      (Physics A highly recommended); successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus and recommendation of current/previous physics  instructor
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
The “AP” notation included in this course title indicates “Advanced Placement.” The course follows the College Board’s Advanced Placement curriculum. Topics include mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. The course work assumes that the student has both a mastery of mathematics and a high level of understanding from the first-year course in physics. The course parallels the first two semesters of a college-level, calculus-based physics course. Triton College dual credit may be available.

590 fundamentals of nursing

Open to juniors and seniors
Prerequisite: Successful completion of a chemistry course
2 semesters; 2 laboratory credits
This course teaches principles and procedures used by the nurse assistant across various healthcare settings to meet basic human needs. Topics include basic medical terminology, body structure and function, concept of life span, communications and safety. The course includes clinical experience in long-term care facilities. This course meets the Illinois Department of Health requirement to obtain a nurse assistant certificate and prepares students to take the nurse assistant certification exam. Dual credit through Triton College may be available. Also, see Fine and Applied Arts, Family and Consumer Sciences course description for Nurse Assistant Program, a course offered on the Triton College campus.