Transition Checklist/Timeline

The following is a list of transition guidelines that students, their families, and school personnel may wish to consider when preparing transition plans. All students have individual needs that cannot be categorized by a disability or age. Students and parents are encouraged to review the entire checklist, which is all-inclusive, and choose appropriate items based on the student’s skills and interests. Items may not necessarily be limited to the categories in which they are listed. Responsibility for carrying out these plans should be determined as transition goals are discussed in the IEP meeting. Students and their families continue to acquire transition information, and with the assistance of school personnel, select appropriate activities and timelines to meet post-high school goals. Participation in the activities listed will help students explore career interests and skills and prepare for life after high school.

By age 14-15 : Freshman
  • Develop 4-year course of study/portfolio

  • Review District Curriculum Guide

  • Review Transition Resource Directory

  • Review the requirements necessary for high school graduation

  • Complete IDEA requirements in completing a transition plan

  • Investigate possibilities of school- based and community-based training work experience and/or career center training

  • Obtain Social Security card

  • Request vocational assessment

  • Request tour of vocational opportunities in school district

  • Obtain work permit

  • Investigate community service/volunteering

  • Identify a student’s personal learning styles and necessary accommodations to be a successful learner and worker

  • Identify career interests and skills, complete interest and career inventories, and identify additional education or training requirements

  • Explore options for post-secondary education/training options and admission criteria

  • Discuss post-high school employment supports

  • Identify interests and options for future living arrangements, including supports

  • Learn to communicate effectively interests, preferences, and needs

  • Be able to explain his/her disability and the accommodations needed

  • Learn and practice informed decision-making skills

  • Investigate assistive technology tools that can increase community involvement and employment opportunities

  • Broaden his/her awareness and experiences with community activities, student organizations or clubs and expand friendships

  • Pursue and use local transportation options outside of the family

  • Investigate money management and identify necessary skills

  • Acquire identification card and the ability to communicate personal information

  • Identify and begin learning skills necessary for independent living

  • Learn and practice personal health care

  • Discuss post-high school community living supports (e.g. alternative residential options)

  • Review health and mobility needs

  • School conducts first IEP/ITP meeting

  • School, families, and students develop transition outcomes, goals and objectives

By age 15-16: Sophomore
  • Review 4-year course of study/portfolio

  • Review District Curriculum Guide

  • Review Transition Resource Directory

  • Guardianship/Estate Planning

  • DRS – Department of Rehabilitation Services

  • Review the requirements necessary for high school graduation

  • Complete IDEA requirements in completing a transition plan

  • Review academic performance and progress towards graduation requirements

  • Review transition plan and document progress timelines and designated responsibilities

  • Investigate possibilities of school-based/community-based work experience and/or career center training

  • Inquire about PSAT tests and accommodations to take tests

  • Explore need for work adjustment training and post-secondary services

  • Research eligibility for case management services

  • Obtain information about driver’s education

  • Begin application process for group home and other supported living options

  • Family and student explore various work, residential and leisure options

  • School assesses and determines potential eligibility for adult service providers

  • School conducts IEP/ITP meeting, reviews case and updates transition goals

  • Family, student, school, and agency define responsibilities regarding income issues, services, recreation options, social relationships and independence training

  • School and family members explore adult service provider options

  • Check on financial aid and scholarship opportunities attend career fairs

  • Talk with people who work in positions that they are interested in

  • Explore degree programs or vocational programs available at local community college

  • Entitlement Benefits (SSI, SSDI)

  • Determine need for financial support (SSI, state financial supplemental programs, Medicare)

  • State ID Card/Driver’s License

  • Insurance options (Medicaid, Medicare, extended family coverage)

  • Identify community support services and programs

  • Match career interests and skills with career-technology courses and community work/training experiences

  • Practice independent living skills (e.g. budgeting, shopping, cooking, housekeeping)

  • Apply for Division of Rehabilitative Services (DRS)

By age 16-17: Junior
  • Review 4-year course of study/portfolio

  • Review District Curriculum Guide

  • Review Transition Resource Directory

  • Review academic performance and progress towards graduation requirements

  • Review transition plan and document progress with timelines and designated responsibilities.

  • Secure and review brochure information regarding vocational rehabilitative services

  • Identify community support services and providers and possible linkages, when appropriate

  • Obtain summer or part-time employment

  • Pursue and use local transportation options outside the family

  • Investigate money management skills

  • Obtain driver’s license (if appropriate)

  • Explore legal status with regards to decision-making prior to age of majority

  • Search WEB for post-secondary training options (colleges, technical schools, apprenticeships, etc.)

  • Meet with college-career counselor

  • Check on college entrance exam dates and registration procedures

  • Apply for SAT/ACT college entrance exams and accommodations, when appropriate

  • Explore healthcare financing/ services

  • Conduct/update vocational assessment

  • Make referral to adult service agencies

  • Provide signed release statement to school for permission to send reports to adult service agencies

  • Send current evaluations (i.e. IEP, ophthalmological, psychological, medical, audiological) to the above listed agencies as appropriate

  • Establish contact with local caseworker in agency or agencies; obtain name, address, and phone number of contact person

  • Send IEP and progress reports to adult service agencies

  • Schedule a visit to adult service agency to meet caseworker

  • Identify community support services and programs (Vocational Rehabilitation, County Services, Centers for Independent Living, etc.)

  • Invite adult service providers, peers, and others to the annual IEP transition meeting

  • Match career interests and skills with vocational course work and community work experiences

  • Gather more information on post-secondary programs and the support services offered; and make arrangements for accommodations to take college entrance exams

  • Identify health care providers and become informed about sexuality and family planning issues

  • Determine the need for financial support (Supplemental Security Income, state financial supplemental programs, Medicare)

  • Learn and practice appropriate interpersonal, communication, and social skills for different settings (employment, school, recreation, with peers, etc.)

  • Create a resume and update it as needed

  • Practice independent living skills (E.g., budgeting, shopping, cooking, and housekeeping)

  • Identify, if needed, personal assistant services, and if appropriate, learn to direct and manage these services

By age 17-18: Senior
  • Review 4-year course of study/portfolio

  • Review academic performance and progress towards graduation requirements

  • Review transition plan and document progress with timelines and designated responsibilities

  • Insure follow-up meeting is scheduled at conclusion of each transitional planning meeting

  • Continue to monitor IEP Goals for appropriateness for adult living and transition

  • Investigate possibilities of school-based/community-based work experience and/or career center training

  • Visit alternate housing (group homes, supported apartments, etc.) (if applicable)

  • Continue WEB exploration for post-secondary training options (colleges, technical schools, apprenticeships, etc.)

  • Contact Disability Service Office at post-secondary school/college and list available support services

  • Requests DRS counselor to participate in IEP when appropriate to talk about referral and eligibility determination for services

  • Become informed about the Transfer of Rights at age 18 (Age of Majority)

  • Conduct/update vocational assessment

  • Apply for financial and support programs (Supplemental Social Security Income, Independent Living Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, and Personal Assistant Services).

  • Identify the requirements of post-secondary school or training program you plan to attend and arrange accommodations

  • Check on financial aid and scholarships

  • Complete research on costs associated with post-school training and/or living arrangements

  • Practice effective communication by developing interview skills, asking for help, and identifying necessary accommodations at post-secondary and work environments

  • Specify desired job and obtain paid employment with supports as needed

  • Take responsibility for arriving on time to work, appointments and social activities

  • Assume responsibility for health care needs (making appointments, filling and taking prescriptions, etc.)

  • Register to vote and for selective service

  • Check on financial aid and scholarships

  • Learn about the salary and benefits in the career areas of interest

  • Increase intensity of advocacy to guarantee smooth adjustment to new program

By ages 18-21: 5th to 6th year
  • Age of majority documentation completed

  • Review transition plan and document progress with timelines and designated responsibilities

  • Insure follow-up meeting is scheduled at conclusion of each transitional planning meeting

  • Complete school-based/community- based work experiences and/or career training

  • Secure housing if not living at home

  • Secure appropriate transportation (own car, car-pooling, bus, cab, etc.)

  • Complete applications for post-secondary school training or apprenticeship and request accommodations (if applicable)

  • Connect with and self-disclose need for accommodations at post-secondary institution, if applicable

  • Register to vote

  • Register for Selective Service

  • Follow-up regarding eligibility determination for vocational rehabilitation services and participate in development of Individual Plan for Employment for services while in school and after exiting school

  • Explore Medicaid options

  • Check waiting list status regarding center-based pre-vocational and rehabilitation services

  • Learn how employment wages affect SSI and/or SSDI benefits

  • Explore post-secondary training and/or competitive employment opportunities

  • Apply for financial and support programs (Supplemental Social Security Income, Independent Living Services, Vocational Rehabilitation, and Personal Assistant Services).

  • Practice effective communication by developing interview skills, asking for help, and identifying necessary accommodations for post-secondary and work settings

  • Specify desired job and obtain paid employment with supports as needed

  • Take responsibility by arriving on time for work, appointments, and social activities

  • Explore Adult Education options if Youth at Risk

  • Members of the IEP team complete the Summary of Performance plan

  • Explore issues of guardianship, if applicable

  • Understand vocational (i.e. supported work, day activities) and residential options (apartment, CLF, SLA)

  • Invite adult service agencies to yearly IEP and plan to meet with them an hour before to discuss adult planning and/or to observe your son/daughter at school